Archive for the '2.0' Category

In doing presentations of the years, I’ve been really lucky to make friends and stay in touch with a few folks out there doing the real work in the libraries I visit. We’ll occasionally exchange emails and ideas and just keep track of each other. Today I got a message on facebook from one of those friends who is now preparing to teach a class in his library that will be somewhat similar to the session I presented to their lib a couple of years ago. How cool is that?! :) At any rate, this person asked if I had any suggestions or topics that are top of mind for me lately that they might be interested in using too. But of course! Here is the email I sent my friend. Maybe you’ll find it interesting too? Or perhaps you might have other/different ideas? We’d love to hear them here if you have any different ones to share!

Oh, and ______, if you want to do a conference presentation like this *with me* some time just say the word, k?

Hey _______,

Always good to hear from you and glad we are keeping in touch as you keep things rolling with your library career. Super cool, man! :)

At the moment, I am especially keen on these things/concept. Not sure if they all fit your class, but they are all sparkly in my brain:

1. Ubiquitous computing
2. Mobile computing (not now but in 10-15 years)
3. Grooveshark.com (and its ilk like imeem.com)
4. freiendfeed as a model for the next iteration of social networking trends (this piggybacks on RSS in a way as I see aggregation being the thing will see this will all come together. I’ve been hollerin’ about aggregation being “it” for years, but until it get wrapped up in the right package it (and isnt called aggregation) it isnt gonna REALLY happen imo.
5. WebJunction, boyeee! lol
6. Acceptance of tools by wider society. It’s like the movies….before there were movies there was more live theater, right? The wider adoption of online tools is a similar sea change…but with serious implications for libraries in relation to:
7. Electronic content distribution and ACCESS. Media companies didn’t want libraries to circulate VHS tapes back in the day, right? Now they are finding and have found some ways (via hulu.com, netflix.com, amazon.com itunes, etc, etc) to effectively cut libraries out of the content distribution model on this “new” intwebs based platform. It is very disturbing and not being talked about or addressed sufficiently by our industry (and its something I hope to work on actually). Again, all my opinions here.

Hope that helps or at least sparks some thoughts. Always great to hear from you.

PS-I’m gonna blog this now. lol! :)”

A Dorks Grooveshark Freakout

Libraries have to get people what they want, when they want it, and in the format they want it. People care about content, not container. And libraries have to figure out how to do better. Why with the ranting on this same topic?

In chewing it over the past few days, I realized that I can count on one two hands the number of times I remember being really stunned by something on the internet. A moment of “a-ha!” or “YES!” or “I had no idea this could be done” and even a couple “I KNEW it would happen!”‘s. Last week I had one of those moments. I have to admit that I was disappointed in myself for not knowing about this service sooner considering that I have subscribed to similar (as similar as possible) services for years to test their functionality and content libraries. This, though, well, this freaked me out. Think about library circulation in the face of THIS content distribution model: “Any song, any time, for free”. Hummina hummina hummina! It isn’t perfect, but I put it through some paces for a couple of hours and am very impressed. I still heart Pandora and getting CDs from my local library, but still…. Even if it is made to go away for legal or copyright issues at some point in the future, think about functionality. This, well, this just blew my mind:
http://listen.grooveshark.com/

The functionality isn’t really *that* different, than services like Rhapsody, MusicMatch (RIP), last.fm, etc, but the model of input into the stream seems to be tweaked a bit. And the pure joy of instant music gratifications will hit you on the head in the most glorious way. It’s funny how looking at something you know fairly well, through a slightly different lens can focus you minds eye more clearly and even turn your attention and work in different directions. Maybe grooveshark won’t freak you out too, but my mind has been all atwitter this week because of it.

And speaking of atwitter…..

Love Twitter? Sick of Twitter? Don’t care about twitter but heard about it a lot? Watch this!

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Now playing: Solex – Athens – Ohio

Libraryman

hi-fi sci-fi library: The Presentation

(Maybe) You’ve heard the song and seen the video. Now you can see the presentation that inspired them both!

-Hi-Fi-Sci-Fi-Library: Technology, Convergence, Content, Community, Ubiquity and Library Futures.
LITA National Forum – keynote – October 18, Cincinnati, OH

Description:
So you think it’s an interesting time to be a librarian now? Just wait! Through an examination of past trends, current tech, emerging tech, academic futurism and a dash of pop culture, we’ll take a realistic peek at where library technology is headed. We’ll then take this information and start planning what we can do now to ensure that libraries not only continue to offer our vital service, but that our role and positive contributions to society increase – perhaps quite dramatically.

The presentation is stuffed full of multi media, special effects and lots of realistic, yet fun and thought provoking surprises designed to get your mind chugging along as is contemplates the future of Libraryland. A future populated with hi-fi sci-fi libraries!

These two intro slides will be running at as people are filtering into the room (they are slightly clipped here, click to see the whole slide):
hi-fi sci-fi library: LITA 08 Intro Slide #1

hi-fi sci-fi library: LITA 08 Intro Slide #2

Hope to see some of you there!

Libraryman

Amusing Repetition: yearbookyourself

Whenever something like this comes up I always think “How could a library use this?”. I’m really not sure about this one, but if nothing else it will hopefully amuse. Lots of folks in Libraryland have been making these pretend yearbook photos (via yearbookyourself.com) over the past week or two so I gave it a whirl as well. For 15 different years. Then I pieced them all together in PhotoShop and voila’! Heck, Peter Bromberg even made a flickr group for library folks making these. If nothing else, it may amuse.

Clicking the photo will take you to the flick page of the image where there are some pretty funny comments. Oh, btw, I used the same image for this “project” that I used for the video last year of me and Michael Gorman dancing together (and he really was a good sport about that btw).
Michael Porter 1956-1994 Yearbook

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Now playing: Weezer – The Greatest Man That Ever Lived (Variations On A Shaker Hymn)

Lyrics:
song: hi-fi-sci-fi Library

Here-in contains collected thoughts from our brains
when it comes to the subject of: wow!
Like: Wow, it’s amazing that for thousands of years
libraries have survived at all
The razing, book blazing, techno staff crazing
fighting competition new tech and how
to emerge like a rocketship, speedy and fast
that is demanded in our world right NOW!!!

Chorus:
Hi-fi, sci-fi, library!
Hi-fi, sci-fi, library!
S. R. Ran-ga-na-than ‘long with Benjamin Franklin,
Dewey, Kilgour and good people like YOU
Learnt that Mashed up with currents and a whole bunch of circuits
info went to many not just the few.
Now we wrestle with techno, money and limitations,
that might sometimes make a good man go “ewww”
But we’re telling you brothers, sisters, ladies and others
that we’re near a massive “Wow!” breakthrough.
it is your:
Chorus

To prepare our libraries we must be informed, explore lots
and have fun learning how to evolve.
Learn about things like gaming, social software and being
just where our users are: that brings us HUGE Wows.
Look at open-source software and the creative commons,
look at netfilx and itunes and learn how
We can take competition, turn it into fruition:
THE LIBRARY FOR TOMORROW AND NOW!
It will be:

hi-fi-sci-fi-libraries!
hi-fi-sci-fi-libraries!

Now we sometimes might wonder how to succeed not blunder
since we’re underneath the specter of “how?”
It’s a do or die sea change and we cannot just remain, what we
were before or we’ll just sink down.
Take time daily, read lib blogs, build community, and
slog the through the learning, practice, wisdom and “pow!”
It will be fun we promise, you’ll work hard but will harness
and endow your libs tomorrow with “WoW!”
The wow of:

Chorus repeated

spoken over the chorus

We can do it.
We just need to be wise
and explain the situation
in a way that’s fun and savvy

Be informed
and connect with our communities.
We must engage with em all
from the kids to my mammy

banter over chorus
*fade*”

hi-fi sci-fi librarians:

Kathryn Greenhill
Murdoch University
Fremantle, Western Australia.
librariansmatter.com

Steven Lawson
http://stevelawson.name/seealso/
Tutt Library, Colorado College

Michelle Boule and Gideon Smith
wanderingeyre.com (Michelle’s site, not Gideon’s;)

John Blyberg – Darien Library
blyberg.net

Jessamyn West
librarian.net

Nebraska Library Commission Staff:
Michael Sauers
(as himself AND an alien and sock puppet)
Allana Novotny
Susan Knisely
Christa Burns

Joanna Axelrod – Escondido Public Library
Donna Feddern – Escondido Public Library

Cindy Hickey – State Library of Kansas
webjunctionworks.org/ks/blog/

WebJunction Staff (l to r):
top:
Chrystie Hill
Michael Shapiro
Allison Severinghaus
Laura Staley
bottom:
Emily Inlow-Hood
Jennifer Peterson
Emily Warren
Laura Zingg

Chadwick Seagraves
InfoSciPhi.info

Steve Miller
Allen County Public Library

http://goateedlibrarian.blogspot.com/

Jason Griffey
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Eliza Griffey
Future hi-fi sci-fi librarian?
jasongriffey.net

Katie Dunneback
younglibrarian.net

Blake Carver
lisnews.org

Christopher Parent

Cindi Trainor
And her two lovely and talented girls. 
Thank you very much, ladies!

Images:

Circuits:
Oliver Ingrouille

http://www.flickr.com/photos/82705724@N00/119490271/

Zombie37

circuit board

quapan

labyrinthine circuit board lines

lungstruck

Red Circuit Board

Todd Cliff

Urban Nightscape

maury.mccown

Custom Boost PCB

MarkyBonn

Electric Piano

diluvienne

I ♥ techno

BotheredByBees

green circuit board II

green circuit board I

oskay

Cylon circuit close up

geerlingguy

Circuit Board

PAUL

http://www.flickr.com/photos/marxalot/378898700/

uLe@Dortmund

mnsc

HDDDetail (Art)

MathiasM

Electric city :) - TTL graveyard

endolith

Top of the keyboard PCB

Dano

Quantum IC

oskay

555 LED flasher 1

Classic

Synthesis Studio

iPod Sport Kit Receiver Unclad - Front

social software:
b d solis (via flickr)

ear buds:
aloshbennett

radio debian

kitty cat cowbell
Chicken Stock

I Gets You More Cowbell

creative commons:

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

drm:

http://www.eff.org/

Thank you all so much for being a part of this project!

-Michael & David

Michael Porter
libraryman.com

David Lee King
davidleeking.com

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Now playing: David Lee King & Michael Porter – hifi scifi library

Libraryman

Twitter Sent Me a Shirt

A couple of months ago I blogged about twitter and the beauty of the “fail whale”. So I sent them a link to my post and said that I really would buy said fail whale shirt should they sell them. To my great surprise they replied just a couple of days later saying “We don’t have those, but how about an official twitter shirt?” To which I very happily replied “Oh my! Yes, please!!”. I then sat back and imagined my geek cred level rising once I started strutting around in my new, yet unseen shirt. And what do you know, just two days later that this little number arrived:
twitter sent me a shirt. Thanks twitter!
I hadn’t actually worn it until today though, so it wasn’t twitter that was slow in responding, but me that was slow in posting their rapid reply.

Oh, and after they sent the shirt I learned that the “fail whale” designer actually sells shirts (and other assorted swag).

Also, while reading the latest issue of “Technology Review” magazine (one of my very faves btw), there was a behind the scenes tour of the twitter office. I didn’t see any of these shirts in the images though. ;) *link* though registration is required to view.

Finally, I would again humbly request that you SEND IN YOU WEB CAM LIP SYNCH VIDEO for our (David Lee King and I) library song “hi-fi sci-fi library”. Info here. Have fun with it! And thank you! What are you people, camera shy? Puh-lease!!!! C’mon, I DARE you to do it!

From the last post you can see that David and I recorded a snappy little library song last week. We are really proud of the work we’ve produced and now YOU get a chance to be in the video!! It is jumpy little ditty about library futures, technology and how we will succeed as libraries.
Please listen to this short snippet and then…..shoot a brief video of you singing along! Thats all it takes! You can use a web cam, or any other camera you like and send it to the email below. It should really only take a few minutes on your end, and after we get the videos, we’ll take the best and put them in the video we are hard at work on! Of course, please also feel free to send other video that might go along with the title/theme of the song “hi-fi sci-fi library” (costumes are very welcome by the way!:)
So join in the fun and star in a video with us! This is your official invite! We are looking forward to seeing YOU in our upcoming video!

Here is a link to the very short snippet to sing along with (you can download it even if you want). The “hi-fi sci-fi library” part is what we really need to see you singing.

If you have you have a webcam, you really should be emailing your video to: michael.libraryman *At Sign**gmail.com

Please send your clips in to the above address no later than August 24th, 2008.

We are really looking forward to seeing you in the video with us!!!!!!!!!

-Michael Porter and David Lee King

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Now playing: David Lee King & Michael Porter – hi-fi sci-fi library

Last week, during an amazing trip to Kansas to speak at the NEKLS Tech Day 2008 (more about that in another post), David and I took a day to record a song that we had been working on together for a couple of months via phone, email and the interweb tubes. We started pretty early and had a happy, long day of fun, creativity, meeting family and, well, making music about the most exciting things out there when it comes to library futures.
The song is called “hi-fi sci-fi library”, and is intended for use around the time I do my keynote session at the 2008 LITA National Forum in October, but I doubt we’ll be able to resist sharing it for that long. We even shot some nice HD video to turn into a music video. lol! It was really fun work and my deepest appreciation to David and his family for their kind welcome. I think we might all still have the chorus knocking around in our heads three days later. Oh, and speaking of the chorus, the song is actually pretty good! It is catchy, fun, quick, (hopefully) inspiring and the lyrics are tight! David and I will both blog about it when we get the mix and the finishing touches completed. In the meantime, here area couple shots of us in the studio:
Me Singing Small

we r recording our song

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Now playing: David Lee King and Michel Porter – hi-fi sci-fi library

This still is taken from a promotional video about facebook*:
built by the people...for FACEBOOK

REALLY?
Well…maybe not so much.
You see, as things continue to evolve in relation to social networking and information access online, this premise starts to become something startlingly close to propaganda. And it is a premise I am beginning to disagree with more strongly. Why? Simply because facebook is a for-profit company. Their motivation as a business both officially and in practice is to make money. While I am positive there are many lovely people working there that are generous, kind and philanthropically minded, the bottom line is that facebook is a company that is very simply most interested in getting people to use their product; not so they can be useful to society, but so they can make money. And they will use they information they get from you to do just that. With no obligation beyond laws (largely constructed to facilitate money making in business) to guard your privacy. And they are under absolutely no obligation to return anything back to the community. Even if the *say* they are nice and want to do good, they are, in fact not formally bound to taking any actions in this regard.

Now, it is very true that facebook is an amazing service that many of us use, appreciate and are grateful to have access to (myself included). But society needs the opportunity to use these sorts of tools and features in a venue that both understands and guards privacy while at the same time protects information access rather then sells information paths of choice (through ads). An institution that is designed to build up the community it nurtures…you know, like libraries and schools.

And it goes beyond facebook-like tools (for community futures). I would suggest that Google-like tools (for search/basic information discovery) should have the same non-profit, ad-free (for the most part), purely motivated capacity as well for the greatest public benefit.

Problem is, when it comes to the future of libraries, and modern/connected civilization’s access to electronic (and physical) community and information access this is blatantly missing from the too dominant tools in electronic search (arguably, Google) and electronic community building (arguably, facebook). And what is missing is starting to feel more dramatic and chasm-like with each passing month.

Libraries need to continue (and significantly grow) their work as professional guardians of community access to information. This means we (libraries and library professionals) need to be the most highly trained facilitators the world has when it comes to information access, community connections, community interactions, privacy protection and electronic tools. You know, the things at the root of the popularity of tools like facebook and Google. The things libraries have been best at for decades (sans the electronic tools part, which is our only real achilles heel in this scenario).

I wish both information professionals and society at large would really seriously think about this. And then act on it in an organized fashion. College professors, primary school teachers, parents, politicians, students and anyone else concerned about the positive growth of humanity should think about this. The “market” does not always dictate what works best for society and this is an instance that requires larger forces than “the market” to intercede. If that doesn’t happen, because of Google-ish and facebook-like tools, our free, unbiased access to information and community stands at risk. There is a potential crisis brewing here and there are not enough people talking about solutions to this crisis in the context mentioned in this post.

It becomes more clear to me with every passing month: some amalgam of social networking tools (like facebook) and for profit search tools (like Google) should be a non-profit that helps people along in their community and information access journeys. All the while guarding their privacy in ways facebook and Google would never dare. Perhaps opt-in’s for users to accept ads could be built into that system to generate revenue to support the system, but in a less integrated way that didn’t affect workforce in the manner it currently does, particularly on facebook at the moment.

So far, facebook has been thumped on here, but Google is in the same boat. Like almost all of you, I use Google almost every day as well. And I am grateful for Google. But words like “Don’t be evil” as a corporate “Code of Conduct” legally means NOTHING (as opposed to a library’s mission statement and governance structure) If you do believe Google cares about ideals more than money, ask who controls their purse strings. Or look at the official Google URL the describes their code: http://investor.google.com/conduct.html. investor.google.com tells us quite clearly where their corportae priorities exist. And what their official mission and business plan entails. Compare Google’s “Code of Conduct” to ANY mission statement** at a Public Library and ask yourself: “Who do YOU want to control and steer you along as you seek information?” Which point of view would most people choose to support given this information?

Misleading content like that in the facebook video above and things like the Google Librarian Librarian projects hold more potential threat than it would first seem. At recent ALA conferences the Google booth was a very popular stop. Many librarians eagerly made videos about how great Google was for libraries…and then *poof* Google disappears from Libraryland for almost a year on their project blog and are nowhere to be found at this years ALA conference. It is that we aren’t importnat enough customers to get Google to stick with us? Did they get what they wanted from us (support) until they didn’t need it anymore? Each side has it’s perspective, but I assure you, Google attends the conferences it feels it needs to. They certainly aren’t staying away because they are short on funds. It most certainly is, at the very least a curious case of unexplained absence. Not the thing to do in the electronic information and community access environment we find ourselves today. It seems that if Google clearly understood this and did have their mission at the front of their minds, they would have thought this through more carefully and acted accordingly.

To this information professional and electronic community activist, it comes down to this: Google and facebook are both businesses, out to make money. Libraries exist to serve their community with information access and community connection opportunities. If individuals or corporations like Google, facebook, etc, really want to get good things done with community, and if you truly care about community and information access, I would implore you to work with library and information professionals, library schools and organizations like OCLC and ALA. Give them resources, support their work with what you are good at, bind yourselves intimately to their success. THAT would do no evil! Most importantly I would ask you to support your local library. And do so in a way that guarantees that participation as long as your company thrives. THEN I will think about giving you wider support and endorsement and not just think of you as a case study in what Libraryland needs to do to succeed without being taken advantage of and potentially usurped by you. Technology is a tool, and we simply mustn’t allow libraries to become a tool that gets less and less useful as it is usurped by a tool that is guided simply by money, with no permanent obligation to give back. That is one of the deepest societal tragedies I can imagine and its consequences would truly be severe and horrible.

*facebook image taken from this video. It appears you are required to be a registered user to view this video.

**Yep, that is a Google search result link.

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Now playing: Beck – Youthless

Libraryman

Wassup With Friend Feed?

Something. For sure. Next gen-ish aggregation mostly. Fun and informative. Sound like a library to anybody else? You can get your own Friend Feed for free you know. :)
Friendfeed
Something Is Afoot with Friend Feed

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Now playing: The Flaming Lips – Free Radicals

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