Archive for the 'copyright' Category

Libraryman

Public Service Reminder 1: facebook

Oh facebook! You big sillies!

“You hereby grant Facebook an irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid, worldwide license (with the right to sublicense) to (a) use, copy, publish, stream, store, retain, publicly perform or display, transmit, scan, reformat, modify, edit, frame, translate, excerpt, adapt, create derivative works and distribute (through multiple tiers), any User Content you (i) Post on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof subject only to your privacy settings or (ii) enable a user to Post, including by offering a Share Link on your website and (b) to use your name, likeness and image for any purpose, including commercial or advertising, each of (a) and (b) on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof. You represent and warrant that you have all rights and permissions to grant the foregoing licenses.”

I mean, we *knew* this, and we do *trust* them. Riiiight?

built by the people...for FACEBOOK
Read this for more:
http://webtechlaw.com/what-facebooks-revised-terms-use-mean-your-content

And, well, just read this guy too regardless. Sensei Rheingold!
http://www.rheingold.com/

With the developing program that Getty and flickr are building to allow users to sell invited pics on Getty, it seemed importnat to give a heads up to libraries. It likely goes without saying, but if you are a library and you get an invite like this, you’ll likely want to decline the invite for myriad reasons (payment, copyright and privacy issues primarily). This would seem to be ESPECIALLY true if there are patrons in the pics (though they require model releases for individuals in pictures).

I do wonder how common these invites are and if this will become more common in the years to come. You can check out the links for more info, but bear in mind that you participate you will give up copyright control and Getty can sell your (now their) pictures to any company that pays, even if the make a product you wouldn’t endorse. I know that for many that isn’t a factor at all, but for me personally it means I’ll very likely decline the invite. And if these were my library or company pics it would be an instant total no-brainer.

Invite to Sell Pics On Getty via flickr
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Now playing: Simple Song – The Meters

It looks like Pandora (and their amazing Music Genome Project) might be in trouble. The “Where the heck did my internet radio go?!” kind of trouble. And it’s not just Pandora in very immediate danger, it is internet radio at large (including my second favorite internet radio station, Radio Nigel). You really do care about Pandora and internet radio, really you do. Here are a few reasons why and an ask as well:
Community Connecting, Pandora Style

I’ve been fascinated with Pandora and their content delivery model for years now. Pandora tries to demo a new kind of service model to libraries. If they go bye-bye they’ll never be able to work with us. Work with us? What am I talking about? While I haven’t blogged about it before, I know for a fact that Pandora loves and supports libraries. I personally know a group of librarians and libraries that Pandora folks help in a pretty significant way. I’d be happy to talk to you about it in person if you have questions. In the meantime, let me offer my Pandora shirt as an inkling that I am being honest about this. :)
So geeked out.  Thank you!

So here’s the ask. And it doesn’t come from me:

“From: tim.westergren@pandora.com
To: ***************
Subject: PANDORA urgently needs your help: Bill Just Introduced to Save
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2008 07:18:21 -0700

Hi, it’s Tim from Pandora;

After a yearlong negotiation, Pandora, SoundExchange and the RIAA are finally optimistic about reaching an agreement on royalties that would save Pandora and Internet radio. But just as we’ve gotten close, large traditional broadcast radio companies have launched a covert lobbying campaign to sabotage our progress.

Yesterday, Congressman Jay Inslee, and several co-sponsors, introduced legislation to give us the extra time we need but the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), which represents radio broadcasters such as Clear Channel, has begun intensively pressuring lawmakers to kill the bill. We have just days to keep this from collapsing.

This is a blatant attempt by large radio companies to suffocate the webcasting industry that is just beginning to offer an alternative to their monopoly of the airwaves.

Please call your Congressperson right now and ask them to support H.R. 7084, the Webcaster Settlement Act of 2008 – and to not capitulate to pressure from the NAB. Congress is currently working extended hours, so even calls this evening and over the weekend should get answered.

If the phone is busy, please try again until you get through. These calls really do make a difference.

Representative Joe Baca: 202-225-6161

Thanks so much for you ongoing support.

Tim”

Initial response to the above looks positive (today anyway), we’ve all seen tables like these turn on a dime. Please don’t let smart but very, very sneaky lawyers from gigantic corporations take away one of the best things going on the internet!

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Now playing:
Dean Gray – St Jimmy The Prankster
&
Dean Gray – Novocaine Rhapsody