Archive for the 'public' Category

The archive of today’s WebJunction webinar with Jeff Dawson from the Lester Public Library in Two Rivers, Wisconsin and myself on Marketing Library Services with Images is live now. You can watch the archive here: http://www.webjunction.org/marketing/articles/content/94460985

Here is a shot of Jeff and I meeting for the first time at the PLA Conference in Portland, OR last week. Birds of a feather!
JEFF DAWSON GETS A THUMBS UP

Also from last week’s PLA conference, here is a link to the write up in Library Journal on the Top Tech Trends Panel I was on. The room was packed and the ideas were flowing!
The Audience at the LITA Top Tech Trends Panel

From that article:
Connecting community and content
To start, Porter offered what he hopes will become the librarian’s mantra: “Libraries need a new electronic content access and distribution infrastructure.” He returned to this phrase repeatedly and tied it to his view of the fundamental mission of libraries as community intermediaries providing access to content. He contended that libraries are at serious risk of being marginalized if they cannot compete with flashier and more robust digital content distribution outlets, like the Amazon, Google, Netflix, and others.

He also made veiled mention of founding a project or a foundation to address content access concerns on behalf of libraries, perhaps even via legal or judicial means. Pressed for more detail by audience members, Porter said the process has barely begun and that he had few concrete details to offer. But, he concluded, “if we can…make libraries the hub, we would be more vibrant, relevant, and well funded than we’ve ever been, and able to achieve the things that are at the core of our mission”—namely, connecting patrons to the content they’ve come to expect to be made easily available.”

That last paragraph hints at a much larger project I have been working on and will be talking about here much more in the coming months. It is a substantial, exciting and much needed project designed to help libraries figure out how to thrive in a world filled with electronic content. Want more hints? Check this out.

As you likely know, the Public Library Association conference is just around the corner, and there are two events I wanted to help spread the word for. One you can even attend if you aren’t in Portland at the conference. The other is a party/educational event I have worked a lot on during my day job at WebJunction.

First, from the LITA list serve, here is info on the “Top Tech Trends” panel that you can attend in person in Portland, or virtually, wherever you are, on Thursday, March 25th. *note* If you are attending virtually you have to register, so be sure to do that if you want to see it. It is consistently one of the more popular and interesting sessions and I promise to do my best, to use the parlance of our times, to “bring it”. In fact, I hope to well and truly be able to say, “Oh, it’s done been broughten!” by the time we are finished. lol! Here are details for that session:

LITA is headed to the 2010 PLA National Conference in Portland, OR for a Top Tech Trends panel focused on public libraries. Panelists include David Lee King, Michael Porter, Monique Sendze, and Kate Sheehan. Program participants will come away from Top Tech Trends with a better understanding of the variety of complex technology issues currently facing public libraries.

LITA’s Top Tech Trends session will also be part of PLA’s Virtual Conference, consisting of live programming chosen from the highest rated in PLA’s session preference survey. The Virtual Conference will feature panel discussions, author interviews, interactive workshops, and chats with colleagues, all from the comfort of your computer.

*Virtual Conference registration closes March 19* http://www.placonference.org/virtual_conference.cfm
Check out the LITA web site for information on Happy Hour and Exhibit Booth hours at PLA: http://www.lita.org/ala/mgrps/divs/lita/litaevents/pla2010.cfm

The second event I wanted to get the word out about is the “Party with Competencies” event, also on Thursday, March 25th. At this event you’ll be able to learn, chat, snack, imbibe a bit and get a first look at a new competency resource we’ll be unveiling. It will be a lot of fun and good company and you will leave with practical info you can use in your training and instruction work back at the library. So if that is you bag, you should come to this event! Please note that this too is an event you need to register for! As my colleague JD would say, “check it”:

WebJunction’s Party with Competencies
6:30-8:30 pm, Doubletree Hotel Portland, OCLC suite 1455
Please register for this session

Grab a bite and a sip and connect with the people and proven competency resources that can help your library! We’ll have plenty of fun, food, festivities, good company and practical material for you to enjoy and take back to your library to help you and your staff learn and work more effectively.

And just a note, to register for that event, you’ll use the OCLC event page. On that page, there are some sessions worth considering like the “Geek the Library” session, the “2010 Perceptions of Libraries in Changing Economic Times” event, and the “Web-scale Management Services” session (which, while to some seems oddly named, is something library folks should be aware of and informed about, and while I keep my day job separate from much of my other work, I would say regardless of where I was employed). There are others you can go to as well, so if you’ll be at PLA and haven’t gone though though sessions yet, well, “check it:)

One final note, I have some video interviews that I conducted during my recent trip to Scotland to present at the EDGE 2010 conference (which was AMAZING btw). As soon as I can get my computer to work properly (I’m currently at the “kick it three times” stage of troubleshooting;), those will go up. One is even with Martyn Wade, the National Librarian of Scotland. It is so encouraging and motivating to see how our colleagues in libraries around the world care and work hard, all for the same positive reasons! So watch for those videos, coming soon. In the meantime, I scanned in some postcards from a very surprising and effective ad campaign the National Library of Scotland is using right now…and those scans prompted a blog post from the CalPoly Library Services folks. Here’s a link. Enjoy!

I’ll be doing a free webinar March 3rd with my pal Jeff Dawson (Director of the Lester Public Library in Two Rivers, Wisconsin). You should come! “Library Images and Video: Engage, Inspire and Tell Your Story” is the title. Here is a registration link with more details.

Session description:
“In this entertaining and heartwarming presentation you will learn how two librarians teamed up to advocate more effectively (and boldly) while staying true to the personality of the communities, the libraries and the staff they serve. You and your library really can market your services and engage more effectively, and images, video and authenticity can be a key! Learn how you too can use images and video creatively and effectively to inspire Libraryland, engage the communities you serve boost staff morale and get more enjoyment from your job. The stories and lessons in this session will be presented by Jeff Dawson from the Lester Public Library in Two Rivers Wisconsin and by Michael Porter from WebJunction.”

I’ve also got a slew of presentations coming up, including two international presentations next month, which are pretty exciting!

Also, I wrote a summary post for WebJunction about ALA Midwinter, (which was an exhausting blast btw). You can find that post here.

CPLA Poster Style Intro Slide

That’s the new intro slide, this time poster style, for the two day workshop I’m leading next week in Mountlake Terrace (just barely North of Seattle) which is part of the Public Library Association’s Certified Public Library Administrator Program (CPLA). This session is co-sponsored by PLA, the Washington State Library (WLA), Sno-Isle Libraries and the Mountlake Terrace Library. Wow! Those are a lot of credits for a workshop! :)

If you are interested, you can still attend as there a couple open slots left. Details on the course and the CPLA program from PLA can be found here: www.lita.org/ala/mgrps/divs/pla/plaevents/cplacourses/tec…

PS- v1 of the intro slide is below. Can’t decide which is best. Or, maybe usable is a better word? ;)
CPLA Poster Style Intro Slide v1

—————-
Now playing: Library 101 ;)

Actually,
Now playing: Morrissey’s new album, Swords.

My heart goes out to Greg Schwartz and the rest of the folks (staff and patrons) at the LFPL. Greg posted these pretty shocking pictures of the damage just s few minutes ago:
That's my office back there on Twitpic

One more image for you on Twitpic

As I write this entry their site is down (as their machines are under water), but once things are back up and running I am sure they will have a way for you to donate to the repair and rebuilding on their web site: www.lfpl.org/

The Seattle Public Library system to close Aug. 31 through Sept. 7
The Seattle Public Library system will close Monday, Aug. 31 through Sunday, Sept. 6 due to citywide budget cuts. Please note Monday, Sept. 7 is the Labor Day holiday and all libraries will be closed. Regular Library operations will resume Tuesday, Sept. 8
. press release here

While I don’t know all the deepest details here, I usually advocate for very thoughtful, strong, quick, dramatic action when forced into situations like this. And I believe that closing the web site is a great idea! That might not be a very popular stance to take, but it does makes good sense if handled properly.

There is no getting around that fact that the reality of these situations makes us feel a bit queasy, but this really is a rare and (hopefully) unique teaching opportunity. As budgets get trimmed all over the world, libraries are chipped at bit by bit. It has almost become a sad tradition of sorts for many library systems. And in these systems we work ourselves silly with fewer resources and less money while trying to not show how thinly stretched we are. We keep doing more with less until…one day we wake up to find that we don’t have things like effective methods of distributing the most popular electronic content available on the web through the library(see Netflix, Amazon and iTunes) or that we aren’t the platform considered most seriously as new display technologies become closer to ubiquitous (see iPhone and Kindle). And we can afford smaller budgets? Well, ok, but there is a cost…and we shouldn’t try to hide that cost from the communities we serve.

So when the SPL site is down I’d advise them to have their page go black expect for a one sentence (linked to the press release) “The SPL and all its branches are closed from **-** due to budget cuts.” Under that sentence I’d have a link that says something like: “When a library is open it returns $$$ value for every $ spent. Click here to read the facts.” and link to solid/scientific examples and proof of the value/ROI of the library being open.

I know its is easy for me to say this since I don’t work for SPL, but I think this is the right way to go. If you get cut, make sure people can see how it hurts them. WE don’t do ourselves any favors by glossing things over and if people clearly understood the costs they might just prevent things like this from happening to libraries in the first place.

But what do you think?

PS-Some library ROI links for ya’. And another doozy!

CPLA Intro Slide 2009

Just wanted to tell folks that I am going to be leading a two-day “Management of Technology” PLA/CPLA workshop for the first time next week. While this is a recurring workshop, it is my first time leading it. And I am excited! But what is the class all about and why is it exciting? Well…
“The basic content of the workshops is of equal interest to librarians pursuing certification and librarians desiring to enhance their professional skills in more informal way. The workshops have been designed to be practical rather than theoretical and include interactive exercises and group work. Librarians pursuing CPLA certification will be required to take a post-test and will be asked to do outside readings or complete a project.”
*link to PLA/CPLA courses page*

The course description page says:
“At the end of the program, participants will have developed a basic understanding of the concepts of computer and communications technologies; will be able to link current services to the inventory of technologies; make decisions about sustaining, expanding or phasing out current technologies; identify and evaluate new technologies for implementation; identify the costs, needed skills, and time lines for new and expanded projects; and create an environment of on-going technological assessment and implementation.”

And believe it or not, we will do all of this in two days. And we’ll have a pretty good time doing it. Seriously!

I haven’t publicized this upcoming workshop too much since it is my first time teaching it and I’ve been doing a lot prep work. Yet the class is near capacity, and there are library managers from all over the country (even the Bahamas?!) registered. So, why not really let the cat out of the bag, eh?

And just so you know, if the content sounds useful to your library or region, you can co-sponsor and host the same (or other CPLA) workshops at your library. Details can be found following the above links. For now, it is looking like November in Washington state is your next chance to take this specific workshop (though there are plenty of different CPLA workshops). Unless of course you are up for a very last minute trip to Phoenix very early next Monday morning. ;)

Gadget presentation intro slide from tomorrow’s event sponsored by the Pierce County Public Library. This presentation’s angle is on the 55+ set. And this is just one of the many presentations that will be held as a part of this event. It’ll be fun and you can come if you’ll be around!

You can come watch this tomorrow in Tacoma if you like

link