Libraryman

2009 Mover & Shaker

It is with a deep sense of gratitude, humility and motivation that I can now happily share some big news with you! Because of many of your very kind nominations, I have been selected as one of the 2009 Library Journal “Movers & Shakers“!

Given the things I get to work on and present about in Libraryland I suppose it fits best that I got plopped in the “Trendspotters” category. And I have to say that being there with folks like Sarah Houghton-Jan and Jason Griffey & Karen Coombs makes me just say “Wow! Cool!”.

Additionally, there are hundreds of other folks who have received this recognition over the years that I personally owe a great deal to. Too many to mention, really as it would be a huge list of hyperlinked names filling the page. Suffice it to say that David, Michael(s), Jenny, Helene, Chrystie, Rachel, Aaron, John, Stephen…oh, just check out the full list already! It is full of people who are motivating, inspiring, amazingly hard working and just plain good people. And if you want them to help you out too I’ll bet they will!

Since 2009 is my M&S “class” I wanted to give a shout to these folks on the list, people that I know especially well, have ben able to work with and am just pleased as punch to see on this year’s short, short list of folks selected: Jenica Rogers-Urbanek, Lori Reed, Lauren Pressley, Brian Bannon and Eric, Jaap and Geert. You guys (and more) all knock my socks off.

Now, I know very, very clearly that for every person that receives this honor there are hundreds of equally (or even more) worthy library professionals out there. I have written in the past that I believe this award is a good thing and does actually mean something. In that same piece I commented that I firmly believe our industry needs to do more to recognize the people that this award does not. So to the folks not on the list yet, the folks that might not know the amazing and powerful importance of their work and the folks that don’t get fancy recognition as they slog it out every day in their library, please know that YOU are are the people that really make it happen and you and the impact of your work are why I try to do as much as I can in Libraryland. I feel the most kinship with these professionals and want to do whatever I can to help them (us, really), especially during these crazy times. So whether you are an LJ Mover & Shaker or not, if you are trying to get good things done for your community though your work in a library and can think of any way I can help or encourage you, please drop me a line and I will do what I can. You know, if you need an industry recognized consultant with credentials to support a programming proposal, budget item, grant or innovative library, learning or technology project, I’m your man. Ping me and I will do whatever I can to help you!

Regardless of attention or accolades, we are all so fortunate to work together in an industry that does so much good for so many people and is filled with the caliber of intellect and professional commitment that we see around us in Libraryland each day. It is one of my greatest privileges to work with you all and I promise to try and use this (and any other) small bit of recognition that might come my way to try and get as much good work done as I can for our profession and the people we serve.

Finally, thanks to all the folks who sent nominations, congratulatory notes or even just sat through a blog post, a conference of staff day presentation, column or whatever I’ve done that might have touched your professional life over the last few years. Also, to Mary, Becky and Steve at the ACPL and Mary K at Indiana University thank you so very, very much! Before I was really rolling along professionally each of you got me up and running in Libraryland at vulnerable times when I really could have fallen over flat. Thanks also to my Grandma, who would likely be both pleased as punch at this moment and would also be telling me to pipe down and be more humble. I miss you Grandma, and you are right, I’ll stop now. :)

I'm a Library Journal 2009 "Mover & Shaker"! Thank you, thank you!! *this picture is supposed to tell a story, but it just looks like four pics of me being a ham. Sorry about that. Still, if you click it you’ll get linked to the flickr page with the story*

PS- I can just see it now on the blogs/twitter/etc “What, did this joker think he won an Emmy or something?! Sheesh!” lol! :)

Libraryman

ACRL In Seattle

As always, good sessions, good friends, big brains and a fine time all around. Highlight from my perspective, as is usual at a Libraryland conference, were all about the people. The Tweetup was a cool addition which many enjoyed, and, again, conversations, particularly over meals, were wonderful and constructive. Libraryland rocks! Here are some photos for ya’:
One diner party group:
ACRL Walk

A amazing librarian and person, Shawn Calhoun:
ACRL2009 MP and Shawn Calhoun

See, told you we had fun!:
ACRL2009 Was Fun

Libraryman

Tough Times: CNN helps get the word out

The more stories like this we see, the better, right? Awareness, well leveraged can equal $, so make sure you collect a few of these “big” stories to share with friends. Spread the word and leverage our traffic and use to help make sure it can be sustained. It tempts me to make webliography to print out and take to dinner parties. Of course that might explain why I don;t get more dinner party invites. lol!

Hard economic times a boon for libraries
” In the past year, libraries across the country have seen dramatic increases in the use of their services, which in addition to free Internet access can include resume workshops and foreclosure seminars.

“Whenever you have tough economic times, public libraries are a place people go because they have no other alternatives or because they know they are going to get the kind of powerful information that will make a difference in their lives,” said Kristin McDonough, director of the Science, Industry and Business Library in New York City.”

A shout out to the libraries mentioned. Good job helping to get the word out!

Libraryman

Public Service Reminder 1: facebook

Oh facebook! You big sillies!

“You hereby grant Facebook an irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid, worldwide license (with the right to sublicense) to (a) use, copy, publish, stream, store, retain, publicly perform or display, transmit, scan, reformat, modify, edit, frame, translate, excerpt, adapt, create derivative works and distribute (through multiple tiers), any User Content you (i) Post on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof subject only to your privacy settings or (ii) enable a user to Post, including by offering a Share Link on your website and (b) to use your name, likeness and image for any purpose, including commercial or advertising, each of (a) and (b) on or in connection with the Facebook Service or the promotion thereof. You represent and warrant that you have all rights and permissions to grant the foregoing licenses.”

I mean, we *knew* this, and we do *trust* them. Riiiight?

built by the people...for FACEBOOK
Read this for more:
http://webtechlaw.com/what-facebooks-revised-terms-use-mean-your-content

And, well, just read this guy too regardless. Sensei Rheingold!
http://www.rheingold.com/

CPLA Intro Slide 2009

Just wanted to tell folks that I am going to be leading a two-day “Management of Technology” PLA/CPLA workshop for the first time next week. While this is a recurring workshop, it is my first time leading it. And I am excited! But what is the class all about and why is it exciting? Well…
“The basic content of the workshops is of equal interest to librarians pursuing certification and librarians desiring to enhance their professional skills in more informal way. The workshops have been designed to be practical rather than theoretical and include interactive exercises and group work. Librarians pursuing CPLA certification will be required to take a post-test and will be asked to do outside readings or complete a project.”
*link to PLA/CPLA courses page*

The course description page says:
“At the end of the program, participants will have developed a basic understanding of the concepts of computer and communications technologies; will be able to link current services to the inventory of technologies; make decisions about sustaining, expanding or phasing out current technologies; identify and evaluate new technologies for implementation; identify the costs, needed skills, and time lines for new and expanded projects; and create an environment of on-going technological assessment and implementation.”

And believe it or not, we will do all of this in two days. And we’ll have a pretty good time doing it. Seriously!

I haven’t publicized this upcoming workshop too much since it is my first time teaching it and I’ve been doing a lot prep work. Yet the class is near capacity, and there are library managers from all over the country (even the Bahamas?!) registered. So, why not really let the cat out of the bag, eh?

And just so you know, if the content sounds useful to your library or region, you can co-sponsor and host the same (or other CPLA) workshops at your library. Details can be found following the above links. For now, it is looking like November in Washington state is your next chance to take this specific workshop (though there are plenty of different CPLA workshops). Unless of course you are up for a very last minute trip to Phoenix very early next Monday morning. ;)

You may have heard that library staff (and their families/significant others/loved ones) are having an increasingly strong presence in the game World of Warcraft. With 11 million players (willing to pay $15 dollars a month btw, so there really *must* be something going on there, eh?), it would make sense that Libraries and Librarians be represented and join together at times. And the Libraries and Librarians Guild is a great way to do just that (more info on getting started with that Guild can be found here). It is a friendly, helpful and fairly wealthy guild that is just for libraries and librarians!

But up until now the “Libraries and Librarians” Guild was only an Alliance Guild (there are two sides or “factions” in WoW; Alliance and Horde). The Libraries and Librarians Guild is on the Alliance side. The thing is, lots of library staff like to play the different characters and lands available only on the Horde side. So now that our Alliance Guild is well established and humming along nicely, we are going to start up a Horde guild for Library staff. And we are doing it in a way that maximizes our Library centric community in WoW. That means we are starting the guild on the same server (Aerie Peak) as our Alliance Guild. There are many benefits to this, but basically it will help the guild get more members and wealth while giving us rare and uniqe opportunity to partner and get things done across what are traditionally “enemy” lines. Pretty cool, eh? Talk about partnership and community. Hey, that sound like something libraries excel at! :)

So, just to review, our Alliance guild is “Libraries and Librarians” and it is on the Aerie Peak server. Our new Horde Guild is “LibrariesandLibrarians” (can’t have the same guild name twice on a single server) and it now forming on the Aerie Peak server as well.

I’ll be logged on to Aerie Peak on the Horde side with my character “Libstauren” on the Horde side of Aerie Peak tonight at 5pm PST/8pmEST and 8pm PST/11pmEST. I’ll mostly be in Orgrimmar (a Horde Capital City). I will try to be on these times for the next four days as well. If you want to join us you are both invited and very welcome. Just a note on our server, “Aerie Peak”. Sometimes you can’t get on the server because it is full. But open slots come up all the time with great regularity. It appears that most will have little trouble creating a character (Horde or Alliance) on Aerie Peak, but if you have trouble getting in, please be patient. You will be able to get on and even it that requires a little patience, it is worth if because, again, we are putting both an Alliance and Horde on the same server for strategic and reward reasons.

If you have any questions, visit our guild web site, email me or leave a comment!) This is gonna be fun!!

PS- We will be needing experienced and/or motivated co-GMs for our Horde “LibrariesandLibrarians” guild so lmk if that interests you!

PPS- A big plug and shout out to Bob Beck at the Central Arkansas Library System who just got funding for a WoW program for PATRONS! He is publishing the story and details as they progress via a new blog. Bob invites you to visit him there and “Feel free to read, comment, criticize or just make fun of me”. :)
LibrariesandLibrarians Horde Guild on Aerie Peak

Libraryman

Twitter Follower Mosaic

So cool! A mosaic of your followers on twitter! It is a happy feeling to see all your friends and colleagues on Tiwtter in one image this way. Definitely a warm fuzzy. Hmmm…. maybe I’ll print and frame it…

Found on walterhiggins.net via Kevin’s blog. Thanks!
PS-Here is a link to a screenshot of the mosaic in case Walter’s site get slammed.

Libraryman

Twitter vs. friendfeed

Twitter vs. frendfeed. The definition and debate could rage (or not be cared about perhaps, lol). But taking all that debate out and forcing a simple choice between the two, which is a better tool?
So the exact question was:
“friendfeed vs. twitter Even if it is apples to oranges, in an all or nothing cage match, who wins?

The answers I got from Libraryland via twitter were:
twitter vs friendfeed -twitter

The answers I got from friendfeed were:
twitter vs friendfeed -friendfeed

My vote would go to friendfeed btw, though having a few choices for the way the information is visually displayed on the screen would be useful imo. On second thought, twitter,please buy friend feed and stick your designers on that interface. You could then take the folks on the ff team that prevent their version of the fail whale from appearing and put them to good use. ;) Sorry twitter, had to tease you a bit there. :)
twitter whale error image

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Now playing: Testify – Rage Against The Machine
and
Passing Me By – The Pharcyde

With the developing program that Getty and flickr are building to allow users to sell invited pics on Getty, it seemed importnat to give a heads up to libraries. It likely goes without saying, but if you are a library and you get an invite like this, you’ll likely want to decline the invite for myriad reasons (payment, copyright and privacy issues primarily). This would seem to be ESPECIALLY true if there are patrons in the pics (though they require model releases for individuals in pictures).

I do wonder how common these invites are and if this will become more common in the years to come. You can check out the links for more info, but bear in mind that you participate you will give up copyright control and Getty can sell your (now their) pictures to any company that pays, even if the make a product you wouldn’t endorse. I know that for many that isn’t a factor at all, but for me personally it means I’ll very likely decline the invite. And if these were my library or company pics it would be an instant total no-brainer.

Invite to Sell Pics On Getty via flickr
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Now playing: Simple Song – The Meters

Libraryman

No infoTubey Awards at CiL This Year

No InfoTubey awards this year? :( Wondering if they will show up in another arean with different partners perhaps? Seems like the award should continue, even if it has a different name or sponsor, yes? Wonder what others in Libraryland think about this.

“The InfoTubey awards are not scheduled for this year. The Tuesday evening session will instead focus on “Dead & Innovative Technology: Moving & Shaking in the Information World.”"
http://cil2009.pbwiki.com/Contests-and-Promotions

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Now playing: Air – Run

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